Sunday, 20 July 2014

Forensic Panel

I was particularly looking forward to the panel on new developments in forensic science, and it  didn't disappoint. As with all the panels and conversations, it's impossible to do it justice here. All I can do is offer a tiny snapshot of the fascinating insights we were given by Tony Thompson, Dave Barclay, Elizabeth Haines and Paul Finch, chaired by David Hewson.
From the earliest recorded forensic examination when someone was killed with a sickle in the 13th century (everyone in the village had to bring their sickles - flies settled on only one) to the most modern methods, the discussion was wide ranging. The panel discussed Oscar Pistorius, and the forensic minutiae left when a victim is shot through a door (leaving traces of wood and paint in the wound). Dave concluded "we mustn't say if he is guilty or not - but he certainly did it."
There was a discussion about how DNA can establish guilt but can also establish innocence, cases where DNA testing was deliberately circumvented, and cases of inadvertant cross contamination.
Paul told anecdotes from his days as a police officer in Manchester, and pointed out how clean crime scenes are when depicted on television, compared to the reality.
Elizabeth explained the role of a police analyst, and the case where she spotted the criminal, while Tony said he prefers talking to criminals, rather than the police, as "crims know more." 
Dave's concluding advice was that if you want to kill someone, "keep it simple. Push them off a cliff." 

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